The Co-Freemasonic Order of the
Blazing Star

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Our History

Co-Freemasonry was founded in Paris in 1883 as the ‘Grande Loge Symbolique Ecossaise Mixte de France’, with the assistance of Dr Georges Martin, a physician and champion of equal rights for women, and a high-ranking member of the ‘Grande Loge Symbolique de France’ and Maria Deraismes, a lecturer and worker for human rights.In 1900 the new Grand Lodge established the full 33 degrees of the ‘Ancient and Accepted Scottish Rite’. Dr Annie Besant a campaigner for the poor, womens rights and for the independence of India and an exceptional esotericist, obtained permission to form a Co-Masonic lodge in London.

‘Lodge Human Duty’ was consecrated on 26.09.1902. The British Co-Freemasonic emphasis on the spiritual focus in freemasonry attracted many men and women throughout the world.

In November 1997 a group of senior masons formed an independent Supreme Council to revitalise and regenerate Masonic ritual and practice with an explicit emphasis on the symbolic, esoteric and spiritual teachings, initiatory training, and the ‘inner’ workings forming the basis of the ritual work. To distinguish the new order from other Masonic bodies, the name ‘Order of the Blazing Star’ was taken. The Blazing Star is a universal symbol, and is found in most Masonic rituals. The principals, rituals and traditions are still based on those of the Grand Scottish Constitutions of 1786, revised and agreed by the national Supreme Councils of the Ancient and Accepted Scottish Rite at Lausanne in 1876.

The Co-freemasonic Order of the Blazing Star has developed and further refined those rituals, working the highly esoteric 'Comte de Saint Germain Ritual' in the craft degrees, and the higher degrees up to the 33 degree. In addition side degrees and side orders are also available for more advanced students.

In May 2007 the Supreme Council decided the name of the order should more closely reflect its heritage and work and thus ‘The Co-Freemasonic Order of the Blazing Star’ was established.